Cytokine Signalling Forum

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Cytokines and Cytokine Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Developed under the auspices of the University of Glasgow supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer Italia S.r.l.

This EACCME-accredited course is a 1-hour tutorial that has been designed as an educational resource for qualified rheumatologists of all levels of seniority to facilitate an increased understanding of cytokines and their role in rheumatoid arthritis, and learn about new and developing therapeutic options that target cytokine signalling pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disabling disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the advent of biologic therapy, many patients experience progressive joint damage and decline in physical functioning. Novel approaches, especially for patients resistant to biologics, are urgently needed. New small molecule inhibitors of intracellular signalling pathways offer a new therapeutic option for rheumatoid arthritis.

By following this programme, members of the Cytokine Signalling Forum will be able to:

  • Explain the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis
  • Understand the way cytokines exert their function and the role of intracellular signalling pathways
  • Recognise the role of cytokine signalling as a therapeutic option for management of rheumatoid arthritis
This course has been accredited by the EACCME.
APEX 2015 Health Awards spring 2015

Module Presenter Video Questions
Introduction
Professor Iain B. McInnes image
Professor Iain B. McInnes

Muirhead Professor of Medicine, Director of the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation,
University of Glasgow, UK

Professor Iain McInnes studied medicine at the University of Glasgow and graduated with honours in 1989 before training in internal medicine and rheumatology. He completed his membership of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP) in 1992 and became a fellow (FRCP) in 2003. He completed his PhD and post-doctoral studies via fellowships from the Wellcome Trust, the Arthritis Research Campaign (ARC, UK) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) Fogarty Fellowship Programme in both Glasgow and Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Professor McInnes’ research interests include understanding the role of cytokines in inflammatory synovitis. He leads a trials unit specialising in the use of biologic agents in early clinical trials in inflammatory arthritis. Professor McInnes has published widely in the areas of immunobiology and rheumatology, and he is Associate Editor of Annals of Rheumatic Diseases and a member of the executive Editorial Board of the European Journal of Immunology. His work, together with that of his colleagues at the University of Glasgow, has been widely recognised and has received many prizes and lectureships including the Michael Mason Prize 2001 from the British Society for Rheumatology, the Albrecht Hasinger Lectureship 2002, the Nana Svartz Lectureship 2008, and the Dunlop Dotteridge Lectureship for the Canadian Rheumatology Association in 2010. He gave the British Society of Rheumatology (BSR) Droitwich Lecture in 2012, and the Gerald Weissmann Lecture in Rheumatology in New York in 2013. A previous Chairman of The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Scientific Committee, he is now Liaison Officer to the American College of Rheumatology for EULAR. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2008, and in 2012 was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Prof. Iain B. McInnes (Bio)
01:43
The role of cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis
Professor Pierre Miossec image
Professor Pierre Miossec

Professor of Clinical Immunology,
Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France

Professor Pierre Miossec received his medical degree from Brest University Hospital in 1983, and then worked as a research fellow at the Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatic Diseases Unit, University of Texas. He received his PhD in Immunology from the University of Marseille in 1987 before going on to work as Associate, and later Professor, of Clinical Immunology at the Claude Bernard University, Lyon.

Professor Miossec’s main research interests include the role of cytokines and T cells in arthritis. He was part of the group to first identify interleukin-1 in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. He was also the first to identify the destructive properties of interleukin-17, and to introduce the concept of its production by a new T cell subset. He received the prestigious Carol Nachman prize in 2010 for this contribution. Professor Miossec is an editorial board member of many journals in the field of arthritis.

Prof. Pierre Miossec (Bio)
28:17 10
Kinases and their role in targeting cytokines - the theory in the clinic
Professor Iain B. McInnes image
Professor Iain B. McInnes

Muirhead Professor of Medicine, Director of the Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation,
University of Glasgow, UK

Professor Iain McInnes studied medicine at the University of Glasgow and graduated with honours in 1989 before training in internal medicine and rheumatology. He completed his membership of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP) in 1992 and became a fellow (FRCP) in 2003. He completed his PhD and post-doctoral studies via fellowships from the Wellcome Trust, the Arthritis Research Campaign (ARC, UK) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) Fogarty Fellowship Programme in both Glasgow and Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Professor McInnes’ research interests include understanding the role of cytokines in inflammatory synovitis. He leads a trials unit specialising in the use of biologic agents in early clinical trials in inflammatory arthritis. Professor McInnes has published widely in the areas of immunobiology and rheumatology, and he is Associate Editor of Annals of Rheumatic Diseases and a member of the executive Editorial Board of the European Journal of Immunology. His work, together with that of his colleagues at the University of Glasgow, has been widely recognised and has received many prizes and lectureships including the Michael Mason Prize 2001 from the British Society for Rheumatology, the Albrecht Hasinger Lectureship 2002, the Nana Svartz Lectureship 2008, and the Dunlop Dotteridge Lectureship for the Canadian Rheumatology Association in 2010. He gave the British Society of Rheumatology (BSR) Droitwich Lecture in 2012, and the Gerald Weissmann Lecture in Rheumatology in New York in 2013. A previous Chairman of The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Scientific Committee, he is now Liaison Officer to the American College of Rheumatology for EULAR. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 2008, and in 2012 was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Prof. Iain B. McInnes (Bio)
23:27 10
Evaluation 4

Date of preparation: June 2013